Drive-thru testing happens Friday, April 17, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., at Stone Church, 1225 Paterson St. You must call (269) 488-0804 for a pre-test evaluation.

Family Health Center will provide drive-thru testing in Kalamazoo County to help understand and address the spread of COVID-19 while ensuring those who test positive get prompt medical guidance.

FHC will host its first drive-thru testing on Friday, April 17, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., at Stones Church, 1225 W. Paterson Street, in Kalamazoo. Depending on the demand, future testing may happen elsewhere in Kalamazoo County in the coming weeks.

Those who wish to be tested must call (269) 488-0804 for a pre-test evaluation, including a phone consultation with a physician to get a doctor’s order for the test. You can also call the number during normal business hours with any questions about the testing.

FHC is among 13 new or expanded drive-thru testing operations across Michigan announced by Gov. Gretchen Whitmer.

“Family Health Center is committed to quality health care for every person. In the face of this global pandemic, that mission is more important than ever,” said Denise Crawford, President & CEO. “We’re honored that Gov. Whitmer chose FHC to play this vital role in addressing a critical health need.”

Individuals will be tested for COVID-19 without leaving their vehicles, Crawford said. Those being tested will need to bring their driver’s license or personal identification. FHC staff in personal protection gear will be onsite to guide individuals through the process. It takes between 10 and 14 minutes to go through testing, and FHC will contact individuals with results in 24 to 48 hours.

A new commercial laboratory in Grand Rapids will be able to analyze up to 3,000 tests per day from across the state, increasing Michigan’s daily average number of results by about 40%.

“The State of Michigan is working with our healthcare partners to step up COVID-19 testing,” Gov. Whitmer said. “Better access to testing and quicker results are critical to our public health officials who are fighting coronavirus and to our residents who have symptoms of COVID-19 and need answers, treatment and peace of mind. More testing will save lives.”

Michigan’s testing priority criteria include those who are:
• Hospitalized patients
• Symptomatic healthcare workers
• Patients in congregate facilities with symptoms, including those at long-term care of elderly living facilities, jails or prisons, homeless shelters, residential foster-care facilities, and other group living settings
• Patients age 65 and older with symptoms
• Patients with underlying conditions with symptoms
• First responders with symptoms
• Critical infrastructure workers with symptoms

Crawford said increased testing will help public health officials understand where COVID-19 poses the biggest risk in Michigan and how best to respond. Crawford encouraged residents to continue social distancing, including following Michigan’s stay-at-home order and maintaining six feet of space from others when you must go out.

The Michigan Department of Health & Human Services is partnering with the Michigan Primary Care Association and NxGen Laboratory, a commercial laboratory in Grand Rapids, to operate these testing sites.